The seed sowing process

wpid-20141003_125435.jpgBack in October 2014 we posted about collecting Agapanthus seed.

We continue this very easy process at this time of the year by sowing the seeds.

The pictures below show how seed was collected from Agapanthus Arctic Star growing in the garden in Autumn 2014.

The ripe seed heads were tapped onto a tray and the black seeds separated from the husk. The seed was stored in an envelope and labled then put in the fridge.

collecting_agapanthus_seed sowing_agapanthus seed2 sowing_agapanthus seed3 sowing_agapanthus seedSeed was then sowed into 1L pots of seed compost and covered lightly. Then they were watered in and placed in a greenhouse to germinate.

Now, we simply wait…

Top Tip: It’s always a good idea when sowing seeds that you use new sterile pots and sterile compost or soil. If you use your own compost mix you will endanger your developing seeds with bacteria, viruses or fungi. However, in this age of wonderful environmentally conscious folk who like to recycle and re-use. It is easy enough to wash old pots with warm soapy water, sterilize your own compost in the microwave and boil rain water to kill the bugs. That is of course all well and good if your electricity supplier uses renewable energy!

Species Rhododendrons Now Available

If you were excited to see Rhododendrons get a mention on the recent the BBC Two series The Great British Garden Revival, you will be delighted to hear that Pine Cottage is now offering seed raised species Rhododendrons for sale.

rhododendrons
(
Picture above accredited to ichef.bbci.co.uk)

Richard Fulcher has always had a passion for Rhododendrons and has many mature varieties in his garden at Pine Cottage which is very much worth a visit if you can make it to deepest darkest Devon during the Spring when these glorious trees are in flower.

Rhododendrons are available in pot sizes ranging from 1.5L to 3L.

Rhododendron albrechti
Rhododendron arizelum
Rhododendron burmanicum
Rhododendron calophytum
Rhododendron ciliatum Edinburgh best form
Rhododendron concatenans
Rhododendron crinigerum
Rhododendron decorum
Rhododendron elegantulum 
Rhododendron excellens
Rhododendron faconeri 
Rhododendron glaucophyllum 
Rhododendron glischeum 
Rhododendron glischeum  ssp rude 
Rhododendron hookeri 
Rhododendron keiskei var cordifolia 
Rhododendron kendrickii 
Rhododendron keysii 
Rhododendron kyawii 
Rhododendron maddenii subsp crassum 
Rhododendron niveum
Rhododendron pseudociliipes
Rhododendron rirei
Rhododendron schilippenbachii 
Rhododendron idereum 
Rhododendron sinogrande 
Rhododendron stewartianum
Rhododendron tephropeplum 
Rhododendron trichocladum 

Collecting Seed

It’s easy to collect seed from Agapanthus plants.

image image

As the seed pods dry they will start to release their seeds. Collect and store the papery black seeds in a paper bag in a cold place until you want to sow.
The best time for sowing is late autumn or spring. Agapanthus seeds germinate quickly in general seed compost with a light covering of sand or grit and water in well. In a cool greenhouse.
We are about to collect the seeds from Artic star here and will continue to show the process of dealing with the seelings through to the flowering plant.

It is important to note that the plants that grow from the seeds will not be identical to the parent. They will have genetical variations and you may get surprising results but you’ll have to wait around 3 years before you see a flower.

 

 

 

Pot Sizes Explained

Pine Cottage Plants is in the process of making online payment a reality for many of the Agapanthus cultivars but It is apparent that most normal folk who know little about plants (including the webmaster at Pine Cottage) will know even less about the complexities of pot sizes and it’s understandable that you will want to know exactly what you are ordering so Mr Fulcher has kindly taken this picture to show you all just to clarify.
POT_SIZES
These are examples of the kind of plants that are sent out via mail order.

Most of the buy online varieties are 2L or 2.5L of which you can see are very mature plants ready to flower the very next Summer.

They are kept in their pots and wrapped up with loving care and should arrive with you in good condition.

They may be on the dry side which aids with transport weights and also messiness, but Agapanthus are very good at conserving moisture in their amazing fleshy roots and their waxy leaves which helps to reduce the rate of water loss. so they will be perfectly fine in transit.

When you get them home you may need to give them a good soak and then either plant them in the ground or pot them into a nice suitable pot containing soil based compost including a slow release fertiliser.

Snapshot of the Rhododendron species growing at Pine Cottage Plants. We are not only all about Agapanthus. If you are interested in these and any other rare or unusual plants please enquire with us or e-mail for an availability list.